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Doubtfire Robert Nye

Doubtfire

Robert Nye

Published 1967
ISBN :
Paperback
208 pages
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 About the Book 

It is too much, we say: too much poetry, too much impossible prose, too much Beckett- Mr. Nye, as the saying goes, is too much. But after that first arrest Doubtfire will be discovered to generate its own conventions, its own forms of solace, and weMoreIt is too much, we say: too much poetry, too much impossible prose, too much Beckett- Mr. Nye, as the saying goes, is too much. But after that first arrest Doubtfire will be discovered to generate its own conventions, its own forms of solace, and we remember that any fiction is a matter of the more than merely life- size, is a monstrous measurement, the calipers taking hold of the object from the space, the dimensions around it. If we are patient with ourselves and allow this author his fine impatience, we shall see not with but through his eyes, as Blake said you should. And as for being too much—did not Blake also say that the road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom?-- Richard HowardLike many contemporary works of fiction, Doubtfire is not a novel in the traditional sense. It does not attempt to tell a story, does not develop a plot, but instead concentrates on a moment in the agonizing strangeness of living itself— which is doubt-ridden, grief-stricken, happy, hopeful, disappointing, absurd, comic, and chaotic. The main character is an adolescent—for essentially this is a book about growing up—named William Retz, who passes from ignorance and doubt to a discovery of his self and his world. There is a rich evocation in the book of everyday life in an English seaside town. For anyone who writes or attempts to write, the passages about creating poetry will hold a special and surprising element of recognition. This first novel by Robert Nye is quite clearly the work of an original literary artist who uses language with subtlety, versatility, and poetic force.